My Mummy's Milk

The Baby Show

The Baby Show

Latest Testimonials

  • Another Great Product By Lansinoh
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  • Best Bottles Ever
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  • Best Transition Bottles
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  • Brilliant
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  • Excellent for breast fed babies
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  • Best For Every Mum!!!!
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  • Better Than I Expected!
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  • Comfortable and Soft Bottles!
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  • Fantastic (5 stars)
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  • Thank you, Lansinoh worked for my feet!
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  • I was at my wits end with cracked lips until I discovered Lansinoh Lanolin!
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  • "...I was thinking about stopping breastfeeding...tried Lansinoh on the off chance it would ease the pain and it did!"
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  • 'The manual pump was quick and simple to use ...'
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  • 'I just wanted to say a big thank you for your HPA Lanolin cream, it's amazing! Not only has it helped...'
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  • 'The (double electric) pump has been very easy to use, super quick, very comfortable and easy to assemble...'
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  • 'Just wanted to say thank you SO much for making Lansinoh Lanolin nipple cream-it's a miracle cream!...'
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  • 'I got on incredibly well with the Lansinoh Affinity...'
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  • 'With the Lansinoh pump I didn't have to worry about...'
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  • 'By far the best breast pad on the market...'
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  • 'If it hadn't have been for your product I would have stopped breastfeeding...'
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  • 'The double breast pump was really easy to use...'
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  • 'The Lansinoh nursing pads are so absorbent...'
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  • 'This stuff is pure magic!'
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What Am I Entitled To?


baby close upIn some workplaces there may be factors which could affect the health and safety of new and expectant mothers.  Working conditions generally considered acceptable may no longer be so for pregnant and breastfeeding women, so it's important to understand what you are entitled to when returning to work.

The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 (MHSW) include clauses that protect the health and safety of new and expectant mothers.  Your employer must conduct a general risk assessment, including any specific risks to women of childbearing age who are, or in the future could be, pregnant, have given birth within the last six months, or are breastfeeding.  Additionally, any breach of health and safety legislation in relation to new and expectant mothers is considered automatic sex discrimination, under the Sex Discrimination Act 1975.  There is no length of service qualification and the Act gives protective rights to a broad range of workers, including the self-employed, agency workers, apprentices, and voluntary workers, depending on the nature of their contract.

It is important to inform your employer in writing that you are breastfeeding (ideally before you return to work).  She or he must then conduct a risk assessment specific to you, based on the initial assessment and any medical advice provided by you from your GP or other health professional.  Any risks identified must be reduced or removed if possible.  This may include temporarily changing your working hours or conditions so that you can continue breastfeeding, or given suitable alternative work if this is available. 

Although not a legal requirement, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) recommends that it is good practice for employers to provide a private, healthy and safe environment for nursing mothers to express and store breastmilk.  It is not suitable to use toilets for this purpose.  Employers are legally required to provide suitable rest facilities for workers who are pregnant or breastfeeding.  It may be useful for your employer to have a copy of  New and expectant mothers at work: A guide for employers, from the HSE, if he or she does not already.

It is not yet a legal requirement for your employer to provide you with paid breaks to pump milk – although the law does allow for some protection.  You could point out the benefits for an employer, such as reduced absenteeism.  A study in America showed that one day maternal absences were three times more common in mothers of artificially fed babies than in mothers who breastfed. 

Find out more about returning to work while breastfeeding with our guide to working and breastfeeding and don't forget to have a look at our back to work checklist for useful hints and tips.

Useful Reading:

A guide for new and expectant mothers who work   www.hse.gov.uk/mothers
New and expectant mothers at work - a guide for health professionals  http://www.hse.gov.uk/mothers